Football

Josh Allen, a medically disqualified junior college transfer, granted permission to speak with other schools

Jessica Sheldon | Staff Photographer

Syracuse second-year head coach Dino Babers confirmed Wednesday morning that Josh Allen can speak with all schools.

Former junior college defensive end Josh Allen, who committed to Syracuse as a transfer in April and was medically disqualified from football at SU in July, has been granted permission to speak with other schools that will clear him to play.

In an email to Allen Wednesday morning, Syracuse Director of Athletics John Wildhack said Allen could discuss playing with other programs “except for other Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) schools.”

But on the ACC coaches teleconference Wednesday, SU head coach Dino Babers said that was a “mishap,” and Allen can speak with all schools, including those in the ACC.

In July, SU Athletics announced that Allen had been diagnosed with a “cardiac condition.” He had just begun working out at SU in preparation for preseason camp.

Allen, 6-foot-4, 260 pounds, was the 27th addition to the Orange’s 2017 class after he played two seasons at Long Beach City College, redshirting a third year. In 21 games at the junior college level, Allen picked up 88 tackles, 29 for loss, and 9.5 sacks. He broke up five passes and recovered four fumbles. He drew interest from Houston, USF, Iowa State, Oregon, Louisville and UCLA, per 247Sports.com.

He committed and signed with Arizona after two years at Long Beach, but he failed to qualify, according to Scout.com. Allen was first offered by former head coach Scott Shafer’s staff in November 2015.

A three-star player, per 247Sports.com, Allen would have had two years of eligibility at SU.

Syracuse (1-1) plays next at home on Saturday against Central Michigan (2-0) at 3:30 p.m.

Additional note from Wednesday’s teleconference:

  • Babers said the Louisiana State primetime matchup set for Saturday, Sept. 23 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana will have a “huge impact on recruiting … them in white, to have us in orange and blue, that’s what college football is all about.”
Comments

Top Stories